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NFIB Index: Small Business Optimism Improves

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) has just released the Small Business Economic Trends Report for June 2010. The report published since 1973 measures small business sentiment on numerous economic and business factors that confront small businesses.

This months report indicates that small business optimism continues to improve.  The NFIB index rose 1.6 points to 92.2 recording the highest level of the index since September of 2008.

During the month seven of the 10 index components rose, with job creation and capital expenditure plans recording minuscule increases.  The Index rose above the 90 level for the first time in 21 months ending the longest period of negative sentiment in the four decade history of the index.

Though seven of the ten index components rose, small business job creation remains weak.  The  hemorrhaging  of job losses has abated employment opportunities with small businesses is not materializing.  Employment is a critical component of the Index and is understood as an important sign of economic recovery.  During the month small businesses continued to layoff workers registering a negative .5 per respondent.   This records the weakest reading for small business employment for the past three months.  The NFIB Index corroborates employment trends recently reported by ADP’s National Employment Report and the Department of Labor.  The small business sector is not contributing to private sector employment growth.  This is a troubling concern because it is widely understood that small businesses need to be a leading driver for job creation to sustain economic recovery.  As we stated last month, historically small businesses have been the major driver in job creation following recessions.  The poor job creation reading by the index  continues to be a  contra indicator of economic recovery. Small business owners are by nature and temperament optimistic and the report indicates that small businesses are still very cautious about allocation capital for jobs to meet improving business conditions.

Highlights of the Report:

  • Jobs:   9% percent of respondents reported unfilled job openings. Over the next three months, 7 % plan to reduce employment and 14 % plan to create new jobs.
  • Credit:  32% of respondents looking for financing report difficulties in arranging credit.  13% reported loans harder to get than in their last attempt. Overall, 92% of the owners reported all their credit needs met.
  • Profits: 17%of respondents reported higher earnings while 49% of respondents reported a decline in profits.
  • Prices:   14% reported raising average selling prices, and 28% reported average price reductions.
  • Capital Spending:  A net 20% of respondents planned to make a capital expenditure within the next three months, 5% planned a facilities expansion and a net 8% expect business conditions to improve over the next six months.
  • Sales: 23% of all owners reported higher sales while 38% reported lower sales.

Overview of the Report

The NFIB Optimism Index records that small business sentiment and business conditions are improving  but hint that small businesses are not fully participating in a vibrant economic recovery story.  The survey indicates that small businesses remain reluctant to create new jobs.  Until this improves, demand in the larger economy and stimulation drivers for small business growth will remain weak.

Earnings and capital expenditures tend to correlate in the absence of  subdued credit channels.  More businesses are required to self fund expansion initiatives and capital expenditures.  With earnings down small businesses spending will remain weak creating yet another headwind to market demand for goods and services.

As government stimulus programs come to a close it is crucial that small and mid-sized businesses (SME) become a lead driver in the recovery.   Though the NFIB index indicates that business conditions and sentiment is improving the financial health and overall psychology of the sector seems ambivalent to its critical role in economic recovery scenarios.

About the NFIB Index

Components of the Optimism Index include: Labor Markets, Capital Spending, Inventory and Sales, Inflation, Profits and Wages and Credit Markets.  This months survey recorded the responses of 823 NFIB members and concluded May 31.

The NFIB Research Foundation has collected Small Business Economic Trends Data with Quarterly surveys since 1973 and monthly surveys since1986. The sample is drawn from the membership files of the NFIB.

The NFIB Report can be downloaded from the Sum2 website. NFIB Optimism Index

Solutions from Sum2

Sum2 offers risk management and opportunity discovery tools to SME’s.  The Profit|Optimizer helps SME’s manage risk, devise recovery strategies and make better informed capital allocation decisions.

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Risk: SME, small business, economic recovery, NFIB

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June 9, 2010 Posted by | economics, NFIB, Profit|Optimizer, recession, risk management, small business, SME, unemployment | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Small Business Optimism Rising

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) has just released the Small Business Economic Trends Report for May 2010. The report published since 1973 measures small business sentiment on numerous economic and business factors that confront small businesses.

This months report indicates that small business optimism is improving. The NFIB index rose 3.8 points in April.  The rise boosted the optimism Index above the 90 level for the first time in 21 months.  The NFIB Index has never registered  such a protracted  reading of negative sentiment in the four decade history of the index.

During April nine of the ten index components rose, an indication  of  improving conditions of most business factors.  The single exception  was employment sentiment which continued to signal small businesses remain cautious on creating new jobs.  Historically, small businesses have been the major driver in job creation following recessions.  The poor job creation reading by the index  continues to be a  contra indicator of economic recovery. Small business owners are by nature and temperament optimistic and the report indicates that small businesses are still very cautious about allocation capital for jobs to meet improving business conditions.

Highlights of the Report:

  • Jobs:   Average employment per firm was negative 0.18 in April.  Average employment has fallen each month since July 2008.   Eleven percent of survey respondents reported unfilled job openings.   During the next quarter 7 percent plan layoffs and 14 percent plan to create new jobs.
  • Credit: The index reports that 31 percent of regular borrowers  report difficulties in arranging credit.  A net 14 percent reported difficulty in getting loans.  Overall, 91 percent of the owners reported all their credit needs met or they did not need to access credit.  Only 4 percent of the owners reported finance as their top business problem (down 1 point).  Pre-1983, as many as 37 percent cited financing and interest rates as their top problem.
  • Profits: Respondents reported profits improved by 12 points in April.  14 percent reported profits higher (up 5 points), and 51 percent reported profits falling (down 7 points).   Of the owners reporting higher earnings, 57 percent cited stronger sales as the primary cause and 7 percent each credited lower labor costs, material costs and higher selling prices.   For those reporting lower earnings compared to the previous three months, 57 percent cited weaker sales, 4 percent blamed rising labor costs, 6 percent higher materials costs, 2 percent higher insurance costs, and 6 percent blamed lower selling prices.
  • Prices: Fifteen percent of respondents reported raising average selling prices, but 24 percent reported average price reductions.  April is the 17th consecutive month in which more owners reported cutting average selling prices that raising them.

Components of the Optimism Index include: Labor Markets, Capital Spending, Inventory and Sales, Inflation, Profits and Wages, Credit Markets

The NFIB Report can be downloaded from the Sum2 website. NFIB Optimism Index

The NFIB Research Foundation has collected Small Business Economic Trends Data with Quarterly surveys since 1973 and monthly surveys since1986. The sample is drawn from the membership files of the NFIB.

Solutions from Sum2

Sum2 offers SME’s the Profit|Optimizer to  manage risk, devise recovery strategies and make better informed capital allocation decisions.

Risk: sme, small business, economic recovery

May 11, 2010 Posted by | credit, Profit|Optimizer, small business, SME, Sum2 | , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

NFIB Small Business Optimism Report for April

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) has just released the Small Business Economic Trends Report for April 2010. The report published since 1973 measures small business sentiment on numerous economic and business factors that confront small businesses.

This months report indicates a decline in business optimism. The NFIB index fell 1.2 points in March to 86.8 That’s up from the lows of March 2009, but has been below 90 for 18 months. The report reading is a contra indicator of economic recovery.  Small business owners are by nature and temperament optimistic and the report provides a sobering insight into the mind of US entrepreneurs and risk takers.

Highlights of the Report:

  • Jobs: After a devastating period of employment reductions, employment change per firm hit the “zero line” in March, setting the stage for a resumption in job creation. Nine percent (seasonally adjusted) reported unfilled job openings, down two points, a “negative” for hope that the unemployment rate will fall. Over the next three months, seven percent plan to reduce employment (down one point), and 15 percent plan to create new jobs (up
    two points), yielding a seasonally adjusted net negative two percent of owners planning to create new jobs, weaker than February and still more firms planning to cut jobs than planning to add.
  • Credit: Regular NFIB borrowers (35 percent accessing capital markets at least once a quarter) continued to report difficulties in arranging credit. A net 15 percent reported loans harder to get than in their last attempt, up three points from February. Eighty-nine (89) percent of the owners reported all their credit needs met or they did not want to borrow. Historically weak plans to make capital expenditures, to add to inventory and expand operations also make it clear that many good borrowers are simply on the sidelines, waiting for a good reason to make capital outlays and order inventory and take out the usual loans used to support these activities. Only five percent of the owners reported “finance” as their top business problem (up two points). Pre-1983, as many as 37 percent cited financing and interest rates as their top problem. What businesses need is sales, giving them a reason to hire and make capital expenditures and borrow to support those activities.
  • Profits: Reports of positive profit trends worsened by four points in March, registering a net negative 43 percentage points (39 points worse than the best expansion reading reached in 2005). The persistence of this imbalance is bad news for the small business community. Profits are important for the support of capital spending. For those reporting lower earnings compared to the previous three months (58 percent, up three points), 62 percent cited weaker sales, two percent blamed rising labor costs, five percent higher materials costs, three percent higher insurance costs, and seven percent blamed lower selling prices. Five percent blamed taxes and regulatory costs. Owners continued to reduce compensation at historically high rates, with 10 percent reporting reduced worker compensation and 10 percent reporting gains. Seasonally adjusted, a net zero percent reported raising worker compensation, only two points better than February’s record low reading of negative two percent.
  • Prices: The weak economy continued to put downward pressure on prices.  Seasonally adjusted, the net percent of owners raising prices was a negative 20 percent, one point better than last month. Plans to raise prices fell one point to a net seasonally adjusted nine percent of owners. On the cost side, five percent of owners cited inflation as their number one problem (e.g. costs coming in the “back door” of the business) and only three percent cited the cost of labor, so neither labor costs no r materials costs are pressuring owners.

Components of the Optimism Index include: Labor Markets, Capital Spending, Inventory and Sales, Inflation, Profits and Wages, Credit Markets

The NFIB Report can be downloaded from the Sum2 website. NFIB Optimism Index

The NFIB Research Foundation has collected Small Business Economic Trends Data with Quarterly surveys since 1973 and monthly surveys since1986. The sample is drawn from the membership files of the NFIB.

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Risk: sme, small business, economic recovery

April 27, 2010 Posted by | recession, small business, SME, unemployment | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NFIB Reports Decline in Small Business Optimism

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) has just released the Small Business Economic Trends Report for January 2010.  The report published since 1973 measures small business sentiment on numerous economic and business factors that confront small businesses.

This months report indicates a decline in business optimism.  The NFIB index fell 0.3 points in December to 88. That’s up from the lows of March 2009, but has been below 90 for 15 months. “Optimism has clearly stalled in spite of the improvements in the economy,” the NFIB said.

Highlights Reported by Forbes Digital:

  • Jobs: 10% of the owners increased employment (the highest reading of 2009), but 22% reduced employment (seasonally adjusted). Over the next three months, 15% plan to reduce employment (down two points), and 8% plan to create new jobs (up one point), yielding a seasonally adjusted net-negative 2% of owners planning to create new jobs, a one-point improvement from November.
  • Credit: Regular borrowers (accessing capital markets at least once a quarter) continued to report difficulties in arranging credit at the highest frequency since 1983. A net 15% reported loans harder to get than in their last attempt, unchanged from November. Although “that is not nearly as severe as the financial distress reported in the pre-1983 period, 24 months of recession have sapped the financial strength of many small firms,” Dunkelberg said. Eight percent of all owners reported that their borrowing needs were not satisfied, down two points from November. The remaining 92% of all owners either obtained the credit they wanted or were not interested in borrowing.  Only 4% of the owners reported finance as their number one business problem (down one point).
  • Profits: 54% reported lower earnings compared to the previous three months. Of those, 65% cited weaker sales, 4% each blamed rising labor costs, higher materials costs and higher insurance costs, while 6% blamed lower selling prices. Poor real sales and price cuts are responsible for much of the weakness in profits.
  • Prices: 10% of the owners reported raising average selling prices, but 33% reported price reductions yielding a net-negative 22% (seasonally adjusted) of owners who cut prices in December. Plans to raise prices fell one point to a seasonally adjusted net 3% of owners, 35 points below the July 2008 reading. “The weak economy continued to put downward pressure on prices,” said Dunkelberg. “Widespread price cutting contributed to the reports of lower nominal sales.”
  • Costs: On the cost side, the percent of owners citing inflation as their number one problem (e.g. costs coming in the “back door” of the business) fell two points to 2%, and only 3% cited the cost of labor.

Components of the Optimism Index include: Labor Markets, Capital Spending, Inventory and Sales, Inflation, Profits and Wages, Credit Markets

The NFIB Report can be downloaded from the Sum2 website.  NFIB Optimism Index

The NFIB Research Foundation has collected Small Business Economic Trends Data with Quarterly surveys since 1973 and monthly surveys since1986. The sample is drawn from the membership files of the NFIB.

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January 12, 2010 Posted by | business, commerce, credit, credit crisis, recession, SME | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Conference Call with Hank

National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) members had an opportunity to participate in a conference call with Secretary of the Treasury Henry Paulson. Mr. Paulson was keen to solicit the support of NFIB members for the passage of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act, (EESA).

NFIB members are small business owners who are generally very conservative, free market advocates who vigorously support tax relief, oppose regulatory oversight and large governmental spending programs. NFIB member firms are the entrepreneurs, shopkeepers, service providers and small business risk takers who populate the small stores and office space on Main Street USA.

Small business owners are a politically vocal and influential constituency whose support proponents need to gain passage of EESA. Last night EESA passed the Senate. It will now return to the House of Representatives for a vote. Secretary Paulson asked NFIB members to contact congressmen, senators and media to urge support of EESA passage.

Key points raised were as follows:

FDIC deposit insurance limit was raised to $250,000

EESA Bill included riders with tax cuts and other rebate incentives

EESA has a recoupment provision “put” that allows Treasury to sell assets back to banks at a previously agreed upon price

Failure of EESA will curtail community bank lending activity to small businesses

Large businesses and municipalities dependent on credit markets for short term funding will scale back purchases with small businesses

Current Treasury tools are not sufficient to deal with problem

EESA funding (Federal Budget program cuts) will need to be addressed in next budget cycle

Regulatory frameworks of financial services industry need to be streamlined, strengthened and reformed

Mark to Market of toxic bank assets will help to temporarily address bank solvency and capitalization ratios

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Risk: bank solvency, credit, interest rates, recession

October 2, 2008 Posted by | credit crisis, EESA, Paulson, TARP, Treasury | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

National Small Business Summit and the Credit Crisis

Sum2 will be participating in this year National Small Business Summit in Washington DC.

The summit sponsored by the National Federation of Independent Businesses, calls together NFIB members and friends to examine and discuss pressing issues and concerns that affect small businesses.

Sum2 will voice a shared concern of many of its clients about the necessity of small businesses to be assured that access to capital during this credit crisis not be threatened. Community banks have an important role to play and government representatives need to be aware of their significance as a primary credit channel for small and mid-size businesses.

Leaders from the world of business and government will be brought together so that a concerted voice that represents the interests of small business can be heard by our elected representatives in the congress and senate.

This years conference will feature key note addresses by, Senator John McCain, Senator John Kerrey, former Press Secretary Tony Snow, former ebay CEO Meg Whitman and Hall of Fame Quarterback and business person Rodger Staubach.

The full summit’s agenda can be viewed here.

Sum2 is a recognized leader in providing risk management innovative solutions to small and mid-size businesses. We are very pleased to be participating in this event and look forward to voicing the concerns of our clients, partners and friends to the elected officials of our representative democracy.

If you have any ideas or suggestions that you would like us to raise please send us a note.

We look forward to hearing from you.

And we’ll keep working for you and our shared interests.

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Risk: small business, political, credit, community banking, representation

June 5, 2008 Posted by | commerce, credit crisis, risk management, SME, Sum2 | , , , , , , | Leave a comment