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assessing risk|realizing opportunities

Credit Redi, Helps Spot Small Business Credit Risk

The recession and credit crunch have shifted financial risk from banks to small and midsized businesses (SME) that often must extend credit to customers to make a sale. When companies extend credit, in effect making unsecured loans, they’re acting like banks but without the credit management tools and experience of a banker.

Credit Redi is designed for small businesses to quickly spot customer credit risk.  Small businesses typically don’t have access to information that provides transparency about customer credit worthiness.  Credit Redi is a credit risk management tool for small and mid-sized businesses.   It only takes one or two bad receivables to damage an SME’s  financial health.  Market conditions quickly change and its critical to have some type of business insight into the businesses SME’s work with.

Credit Redi is also an excellent tool to determine the financial health of critical suppliers.  A key supplier going out of business could have disastrous consequences for SMEs.  Credit Redi  monitors the financial health of existing suppliers and help managers make wiser choices in supply chain and business partner decisions.

Get Credit Redi here: 

Risk: SME, credit risk, supply chain, partnerships, customers, receivables

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January 10, 2011 Posted by | business, credit, Credit Redi, product, small business, SME, Sum2 | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Avoiding Bankruptcy

bankruptcyThe soft economy, the rise of inflation and the curtailment of credit is having a dramatic effect on small businesses. Annual bankruptcy rates among small businesses is sky rocketing. As the recession continues small business bankruptcy will continue to rise.

Bankers are undertaking a comprehensive review of their small business loan portfolios to enhance risk mitigation programs. They are increasingly driven to engage their small business clients to determine if they can detect any problems that is affecting their clients financial health. Poor operating performance leads to a distressed condition that can ultimately lead to insolvency.

Banks are becoming more proactive. Small business managers need to take action to uncover the factors that are damaging the business.  They must recognize the early warning signs of an emerging distressed condition to remain in the good graces of bankers by honoring the parameters of existing loan covenants.

Banks are taking the lead.  Bankers are initiating an effective engagement process by conducting business reviews  that disseminate information and provide tools to help businesses identify sources of risk in clients business operation. It is incumbent on small business managers to understand how changing market dynamics and operational risk factors are impacting their business and more importantly demonstrate a willingness to take steps to mitigate these factors

The problems posed by curtailment of credit and rising unemployment pose acute threats to small businesses. This is particularly true for businesses that cater to retail consumers. The erosion of consumer buying power due to loss of income and evaporation of customers credit lines means that they won’t be purchasing goods and services offered by small businesses.  Small business sales and profitability evaporates due to exposures to these risk factors.  Small businesses must devise strategies to address these types of risks.

Bankers need to be involved with their small business clients to determine how these risk factors are affecting business profitability and what steps need to be taken to temper their effect.  This a great opportunity for bankers to enhance their engagement level with small business clients. The exercise will preserve relationships, mitigate potential credit defaults and build the banks brand as an effective and involved partner to small businesses.

Sum2 provides a series of risk assessment products that assist companies to chart paths to profitability and growth.  Please visit our website to learn more about the Profit|Optimizer, a unique risk management and opportunity discovery tool that can help you more effectively manage the challenges posed by the recession.

You Tube Video:

risk: credit, bankruptcy, banking, SME

August 20, 2009 Posted by | commerce, credit crisis, recession, SME, unemployment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Managing Infuenza Pandemic Risk

pandemicThe Swine Flu outbreak carries with it the potential to severely damage the financial health of small and mid-size enterprises (SMEs). Left unmanaged pandemics can impair profits, generate losses, undermine the contribution of key employees, disrupt supply chains, halt operations, undermine an enterprises financial health that can ultimately lead to bankruptcy.

Though many consider pandemics as a force majeure risk event that cannot be controlled, businesses can take steps to mitigate and manage the drastic challenges a pandemic can pose to a business. This is particularly important for businesses that find themselves in a weakened position due to the recession. Businesses that have become highly stressed due to the current business cycle are at acute risk of becoming insolvent due to the shock of this potentially catastrophic risk event. Business managers, bankers, shareholders and businesses with extended supply chains need to take steps to manage and mitigate the sever effects of pandemic risk.

The first step is to create or update a business continuity plan. Business continuity plans need to address a range of issues that includes planning for disasters and planning for the unique risk factors of an influenza pandemic need to be integrated into business processes.

All businesses are unique. Addressing a pandemic risk event in your business plan will require you to conduct a risk-management assessment on all aspects of your operations, business processes and market impact to ensure continued operation and financial health.

Some things management must consider in its review are:

  • Assess how you work with employees, customers, contractors to minimize contagion threats
  • Determine mission critical business functions your business requires to maintain operations
  • Stress test your business operations to determine how to function with up a 40% absentee rate
  • Review inventories in case foreign or domestic suppliers and transport services are interrupted
  • Review your supply chains, determine at risk suppliers and identify backups
  • Reorganize work spaces to minimize the spread of the disease
  • Equip employees to support telecommuting
  • Develop communication strategies to inform employees, customers and the media
  • Use this opportunity to expand your e-commerce capability
  • Promote awareness of the problems associated with pandemic flu
  • Alert employees about what steps you’re taking and what they can do to limit the pandemic’s impact
  • Review sick-leave and pay policies to ensure they don’t discourage workers from staying home when they’re ill
  • Make backup plans if you need to pull people out of countries where the epidemic strikes
  • Develop a travel policy that restricts travel to areas where the virus is active
  • Stock up on masks and sanitizers, and consider staggering work hours to limit the size of gatherings

Sum2 publishes the Profit|Optimizer product series.  The Profit|Optimizer is the leading SME risk management platform that helps business managers and business stakeholders quickly assess enterprise risk factors and take considered action to mitigate and manage those risk factors. Sum2 will be releasing a pandemic risk assessment module by the close of this week.  The product will retail for $95.00 and will assist SME’s to assess, mitigate and manage the threats posed to their business by pandemics and other social disasters.

More information can be found on our website www.sum2.com.

Sum2 help our clients assess risk and realize opportunities.

April 30, 2009 Posted by | business continuity, disaster planning, recession, risk management, Sum2, supply chain | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment