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Rutgers Job Study: Full Employment By 2017!

help wantedRutgers University has released a sobering study on expected recovery rates in employment levels for the United States economy.   The study,  America’s New Post-Recession Employment Arithmetic indicates that the employment deficit has grown so large that it may take until 2017 for the nation’s labor market to return to its pre-recession level.

The study, released by the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy is a cause for concern.  The study reports that the US economy has shed over 7 million jobs since the recession officially began in December 2007.  This has reduced the total number of jobs in the United States by 5.8%, the largest drop during any downturn since World War II.  The authors of the study, James W. Hughes and Joseph J. Seneca, project that the employment deficit will total 9.4 million private sector jobs by the end of the year.

The study estimates that if the economy adds more than 2 million jobs annually starting next year, it would take until August 2017 – more than seven and a half years – to both recover the jobs lost since December 2007 and create new positions for the roughly 1.3 million people who join the labor force each year.

Hughes and Seneca believe that a recovery in 2017 may be an optimistic assumption.  An economic expansion that lasts for seven years is about 50 percent longer than the average for postwar recoveries.   Hughes and Seneca refer to the last ten years as “The Lost Employment Decade,” because the U.S. is on track to finish this year with 1.3 million fewer total jobs than it had in December 1999. “This is the first time since the Great Depression of the 1930s that America will have an absolute loss of jobs over the course of a decade” the report states.

The past decade has witnessed a startling reversal in economic fortunes for the US economy.   The U.S. finished the 1990s with 19  million more private sector jobs than it had at the start of the decade.   Approximately 16 million jobs were created during the 1980s.  Before the recession,  annual rate of job growth was about 1 million jobs per year, about half of the growth rates of the previous two decades.

Hughes and Seneca believe that this will force states into fierce competition to realize job growth.  States must respond by creating desirable environment for business based on costs, affordability, business climates, support infrastructure, labor force quality and tax policies.

We believe that joblessness and unemployment continue as significant threats to economic growth.   The conception of  the unemployment rate as a lagging indicator is emerging as a lead driver inhibiting economic recovery.  High unemployment continues to inhibit consumer spending and works against a rebound in the housing market and related construction industries.  Retailers are already bemoaning the bleak forecast for this years holiday shopping season.  State and local governments reeling from dwindling tax receipts are beginning to crack under the strain to fund basic community services, public schools and social assistance programs.

The structural dysfunction of the  American economy is a critical issue that must be addressed.  A concerted program aimed at the development and incubation of SME manufactures will encourage the entrepreneurial energy and kick start badly needed economic drivers  to ignite a recovery.  Sum2 advocates the adoption of The Hamilton Plan and the creation of an SME Development Bank to reestablish sustainable growth and national prosperity.

You Tube Music Video: Bruce Springsteen Seeger Sessions, Pay Me My Money Down and Erie Canal

(RU and Bruce, Perfect Together)

Risk: unemployment, job creation, SME, political stability, recession,

October 8, 2009 Posted by | associations, business, commerce, economics, government, Hamilton Plan, labor, manufacturing, poverty, recession, risk management, SME, unemployment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Nike Resigns US Chamber of Commerce Board Seat

climate change wcNike has resigned from the board of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce for its opposition to the cap-and-trade bill now being considered by the Senate.   Nike moves comes on the heals of Exelon announcement to quit the Chamber altogether over its concern that the nations largest business lobby body was hindering legislative action to deal with the pressing problems of climate change.

As the December Copenhagen Summit on climate change nears pressure is growing on the United States to pass the cap-and-trade bill stalled in the senate. Companies with a strong commitment to corporate social responsibility agenda are becoming more vocal in support of legislative and corporate initiatives that address climate change.

Nike’s high profile action places associations and business advocacy groups on notice that it expects such groups to seek ways they can make positive contibutions to addressing pressing issue of climate change.

Nike insists that it expects the representative bodies of businesses to have a little less conversation and demands much more action to address the pressing  problem.

You Tube Video: Elvis Presley, Little Less Conversation

Risk: climate change, legislative, corporate responsibility

October 4, 2009 Posted by | associations, environment, legislative, reputational risk, sustainability | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

G-20 Fallout: French Banks Exit Tax Havens

french bank tokenAn official at the French Banking Federation announced that French banks plan to close shut branches and subsidiaries in countries considered tax havens. France’s banks intend to halt business activities in countries that remain on the OECD’s so-called “gray list” at the end of March 2010.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development advocates regulatory standards for global banking industry. It tracks countries that do not comply with the basic regulatory guidelines and publishes a “gray list” of countries that do not comply with international tax information exchange rules.

All French Banks will comply with this action. BNP Paribas earlier announced it will stop operating in countries considered tax havens after the bank indicated that it would close branches in Panama and the Bahamas.

Global hedge funds that operate in OECD non-compliant jurisdictions have an increased tax risk profile.  Tax professionals need to assess the potential benefits derived from continued operations in these high risk domiciles with the rising compliance and tax risk factors these jurisdictions pose.

Sum2’s IRS Audit Risk Program (IARP)  helps tax professionals and compliance managers determine and score risk exposures of investment partnerships IRS Industry Focus Issues.

Click for more information on IARP.

Risk: compliance, regulatory, tax audit, reputation

October 1, 2009 Posted by | associations, banking, hedge funds, IARP, OECD, off shore, private equity, reputational risk, risk management, Tax, Treasury | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

PCA Goes To The Lonesome Valley

PCA RIP

PCA RIP

On Monday came the not surprising news that Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) has filed for bankruptcy.

The practice of selling food additives laced with salmonella bacteria makes it difficult to win back the trust of customers that had been so grievously violated.

PCA’s actions to knowingly ship contaminated products that have resulted in nine deaths and have sickened 637 people in 44 states. PCA’s salmonella laced peanut paste has contaminated 2,226 processed food products. A full list of recalled products can be found on the FDA website. These potentially criminal acts by PCA’s management has demolished the PCA corporate brand making it impossible to continue as a going concern.

The Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing will liquidate the company. This strategy will protect the PCA shareholders in the privately held firm from the significant legal liability that this event has created. It does not however protect PCA’s company management and accomplices that knowingly shipped contaminated products from potential criminal prosecution. Criminal persecution of those involved should be pursued and if anyone is found guilty punishment must be severe.PCA released its contaminated product into a large and extensive supply chain. Many leading brand food processing manufacturers that use PCA’s peanut paste as an ingredient in their packaged goods products have suffered severe reputational damage to their product and company brands. Though PCA’s corporate liability may be mitigated with the bankruptcy filing, aggrieved consumers will continue to have have legal recource by filing suits against the major consumer product companies that are still in business. This could make for a record breaking class action product liability suit.

Unfortunately this tragic occurrence could have been prevented. PCA’s actions demonstrate a disturbing ambivalence toward effective sound corporate governance practices. Companies that willingly sacrifice risk management and ethical business practices for the sake of short term profits consistently undermine corporate sustainability. All may not result in a dramatic corporate implosion like PCA. But ultimately the song of corporate liquidations remains the same. Unemployment for workers, aggrieved consumers, community desertion, tortured consciences and and in some instances criminal prosecution.

RIP PCA.

You Tube Video: Fairfield Four, Lonesome Valley

Risk: corporate goverance, ethics, risk management, legal

February 18, 2009 Posted by | associations, compliance, manufacturing, Peanut Corporation of America, product liability, supply chain, sustainability | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Peanut Corporation of America

A salmonella breakout that has been traced to peanut products marketed by the Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) is an unfortunate and severe example of a company with poor risk management, weak corporate governance controls and questionable ethical business practices. In most instances poor risk management and corporate governance violations primarily victimizes the company that fails to institute them. In the case of the PCA, unsound business practices has unleashed a deadly viral bacteria into a vast consumer market. Since its outbreak in October the salmonella infection is believed to have claimed the lives of 8 people and has sickened over 500. PCA violations will also cast a long shadow on the vibrant US peanut growers and processing industry.

A brief examination of some of the public disclosures that have come to light concerning the PCA speaks of a telling breakdown in sound risk management practices. These disclosures also hints at potential instances of fraud to cover up lax controls and compliance violations cited by FDA and State of Georgia food safety examiners.

The PCA had been cited for violations and lax operational controls during past inspections by regulatory agencies. Inspectors found evidence of roach infestation and mold in the production and storage facilities. Inspections also revealed that product quality had been compromised due to a degraded manufacturing process and improper maintenance of the operating facility. After bringing this to the attention of company management PCA executives sought out food testing companies that would provide results to indicate that product quality met federal safety standards and were safe to ship.

Utilizing industry standard risk analysis tools like the Profit|Optimizer would have revealed several breaches in sound risk management practices at PCA. Lax operational controls, poor facilities and the evasion of corporate governance practices will likely put PCA out of business due to the damage its actions have done to company product brands and reputation.

Problems and risks associated with process manufacturers like PCA add layers of complexity to determine product risk due to its role as a supplier in an intricate and expanded supply chain for processed consumer food products. The melamine contamination of Chinese milk products and the mortgage backed securities market crisis provide examples of how product liability and consumer risk is leveraged due supply chain complexity. The pervasiveness of products that use the peanut paste manufactured by PCA is very similar in many respects. Cookies, ice cream, crackers and other products are subject to recall. Some of the companies affected by PCA’s contaminated products include premium consumer product and brand marketing companies like Kellogg, General Mills, Jenny Craig, Nuti-System and Trader Joes.

Severe product liability events like this unfortunately also cast aspersions on an entire industry. Associations like the American Peanut Council are most concerned that the poor manufacturing practices and product quality standards exhibited by PCA will reflect on how consumers view the industry as a whole. It is a valid concern for the industry association and it must demonstrate to the regulators and consumers that its membership is committed to sound manufacturing practices, product quality and corporate governance excellence. This is not a PR problem. Nor is it a problem born from an industries anathema to regulatory control or a problem unleashed by some renegade industry member. Industries and their representative associations must also help address sound risk management and corporate governance excellence as a cultural issue that is endemic to its membership. Then industry excellence becomes synonymous with product quality and consumer satisfaction.

In all the FDA uncovered 10 violations and has published its report and carries a full listing of recalled products and other resources on the FDA website.

You Tube Video: Dizzy Gillespie’s Big Band, Salt Peanuts

Risk: product, operations, regulatory, reputation

January 29, 2009 Posted by | associations, manufacturing, operations, Peanut Corporation of America, product liability, regulatory, reputation, risk management, supply chain | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment